US Speaking Engagements – The Future Of Christendom Conference

Worldwide, it’s not uncommon to hear filthy language spewed from the tongues of those with utmost contempt toward the Biblical worldview, especially when that worldview is espoused by Christians.

In Africa, my native continent, the hatred towards Christians is expressed not only by the tongue, but also often the gun—in individual violence and outright warfare. Spiritual warfare—including demonic attacks—are frequent.

As a witness—and survivor—of attacks in both the natural and supernatural, I can attest to the impact of both. As I prepare to visit the United States for speaking engagements, I’m sure my testimony will challenge many—particularly those comforted by the “scientific consensus” that such incidents exist only in the imaginations of primitive peoples.

Physical attacks

On July 25, 1993, terrorists stormed the sanctuary where I was worshiping during a Sunday evening service. They opened fire with automatic rifles and lobbed hand grenades—which they had affixed with nails—into the crowd of 1,000.

As detailed in my book, Shooting Back, I was armed with a snub-nosed .38 special revolver. By God’s grace, I managed to return fire, hitting one attacker and making them flee.

My pastor friends in the Democratic Republic of Congo recount rebel soldiers entering a church. The rebels blamed the church members for turning the tide of the war against them through prayer. Church members were warned that, if they continued to pray, the rebels would return to bury their pastor alive.

The Congolese Christians quickly determined that a church that isn’t praying, isn’t the Church.

The rebels kept their word. The pastor was buried alive, leaving behind his wife and three young children.

Already disarmed by the government’s gun-free zones, the pastor and congregation had no firearms with which to defend themselves.

Spiritual attacks

Fortunately, during spiritual attacks, Christians have weapons more powerful than firearms with which to respond.

After a Sunday morning worship service at the Come and See Church in Lubumbashi, Congo, my colleague, Ron, and I were asked to pray for the church secretary who had been sick for months. We laid hands on our ill Christian sister and started to pray. Suddenly, her back arched and formed a hunchback. She screeched and fell to the floor with the force of a drop from a dizzying height, her head barely missing a coffee table.

Ron and I scampered over the fallen chair to keep our hands on her as we prayed in the Name Above All Names, Jesus Christ. We asked for the Lord to sovereignly intervene and cast out all demonic forces.

It ended just as quickly as it started. The woman lay dead still on the floor. Our pastor friends watched wide-eyed. She then calmly stood up, with a peaceful look on her face, thanked us in French, and left as if nothing had happened.

Months later we learned our new friend was healthy and strong with no signs of illness.

“Therefore submit to God. Resist the devil and he will flee from you.” James 4:7

U.S. speaking engagements

A firearm can defend you in a physical attack. The victorious Name of Jesus can protect you in both the physical and spiritual realms. Christians everywhere need to know how to use both effectively.

“…be strong in the Lord and in the power of His might. Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil.” Ephesians 6:10-11

Spiritual attacks, the right weapons of defense and the future of Christendom are the topics I’ll address on my summer visit to the United States. Speaking dates include:

10 a.m. June 25: Reedy River Presbyterian Church in America, 46 Main Street, Conestee, S.C.

10:30 a.m. July 2: Christ the King Church, 1380 N College Rd, Wilmington, N.C.

3:30 p.m. July 8:  Mid-Atlantic Reformation Society’s “The Future of Christendom” conference (July 7-9) at Crowne Plaza Hotel, Reading, PA. Visit https://futureofchristendom.org/  for the full schedule.

Charl van Wyk

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